Textiles for Neoprene

Industry experts for nylon and aramid to neoprene

Textiles for Neoprene – Compotex

Chloroprene rubber, commonly known as neoprene, is a widely used synthetic rubber. It has excellent dynamic properties. Compared to natural rubber, it has good resistance to chemicals and ozone, and weathers well. It also has good abrasion resistance and heat resistance. It has excellent fire retardant properties.

Because of its good mechanical properties, textile reinforced neoprene rubber is widely used in many industries, for example drive belts, hoses, seals and diaphragms and anti-vibration blocks.

Compotex has advanced production facilities for a wide range of treatments for the adhesion of textiles to neoprene rubber. We offer laboratory samples and small production trials for all new developments, without any minimum fabric length or order value.

Our customers often use nylon fabrics for neoprene rubber reinforcement. We use RFL in a single-stage process. Neoprene is also reinforced with para-aramid, polyester and (occasionally) glass fabrics. For these reinforcements, Compotex uses a Grilbond pre-treatment of the fabric before the RFL to achieve high adhesion.

Neoprene is a registered trademark of DuPont Performance Elastomers.

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Compotex has advanced production facilities for a wide range of treatments for the adhesion of textiles to neoprene rubber.

Textiles for Neoprene Example

A company approached us for fabric for anti-vibration blocks. These blocks are made up of many rubber and fabric layers.

In this case, the company had specified neoprene rubber, and they approached Compotex to find a fabric that had the right technical specification, and gave strong adhesion to their neoprene rubber in the curing process.

Our first discussion was on the options for the textile. We decided on nylon fabric for its tensile strength and for its stretch and elongation characteristics that would fit with the dynamic strength and flexibility of the finished block.

Our second discussion was on the dipping specification, in this case RFL technology. We also agreed the dip pick up we wanted, to give the right adhesion to the neoprene as well as the right flexibility and handleability of the fabric, both during processing and in the finished part.

With the specifications agreed for the textile and the dip, the project moved into production.